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in a wireline or wireless environment. america's future is a wireline future. >> u.s. telecom head walter mccormick much night on the communicators at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2. >> i got upset with the president. covered my mental health meetings ist few had, and then they never showed up. i was walking in the white house and met this woman who was a press person. you do not ever cover my meetings. she said mental health is not a issue. but we found out what was needed and developed legislation. we passed the mental health systems act of 1980. through congress one month before jimmy, as he says, retired fromrily the white house. the incoming president put it on a shelf and never implemented it. it is one of the greatest disappointments in my life. atrosalynn carter, tonight 9:00 eastern, live on c-span and c-span3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. world institute of politics held a discussion on the intelligence committee and national security in washington d c. lieutenant general michael flynn talks about the security landscape, addressed global trends like population growth, urb
in an environment like this where i could explore whatever i could become passionate about. it was a fantastic opportunity. it actually got me out of clinical research and ultimately into doing more basic neuroscience . i spent 20 years looking at the doing thats -- research. and i came back to the nih. host: we have a call from missouri. good morning. caller: thank you for c-span. i finished two books by caroline leaf. i do not know whether she is a psychologist or psychiatrist. but her books are on thoughts and what enters the brain. i just find it really hard to stay with this problem because i have got a lot of problems with hate. and all of the information i see on television seems to be trytive information, and i to eliminate all of that. but it is almost impossible. all the wars. i mean, i am so happy that you have this program on this morning. i am going to hang up and listen to the program. thank you very much. host: thank you for the call. guest: by the way, i would like to make one remark. i am so delighted to have you here at nih. but i would not want your viewers to think that the
it is today on the internet or pamphlets in the old day, it is two-way conversational environment and people are passing things two and from friends and exchanging information along social networks and that is why it is social networking. this creates a community. that is what a social environment looks like and we have familiar with that on facebook and twitter. we see stuff from people we follow. the difference with mass media is that mass media is one-way and impersonal and talked down broadcast. the radio sits in the corner of the room. it isn't social. it is sitting there and you are not having a conversation with it. and no social networking or personal recommendation involved. we have come to thing of one-way media channels that reach a large audience; newspaper, television and internet. and we come to think this now is a change and we can get news from friends and you don't need to be a newspaper editor to decide what message is going to spread. but this is how things were in the era before the mass media. wuch co-- the period before old media looks very familiar. it is social from t
other, and it's very much a social environment. but there are many examples that occur throughout history, martin luther and his use of pamphlets, thomas paine and his pamphlet, "common sense," and the way they were used more broadly in the runup to the american and french revolutions. really what i'm arguing is when we use social media today, it's a reversion, actually, to the way media operated for centuries before us. >> host: you write that for wealthy romans, the distinction between letter writing and conversation was further blurred by the custom of dictating outgoing letters to scribes and having incoming letters read aloud to them. >> guest: indeed. so if you were someone like cicero or julius caesar, you would have a scribe. in fact, cicero -- sorry, caesar, was famous for being able to dictate two letters at once. so you would be dictating, then you would also have a staff of messengers who would be carrying these messages to your friends, and when incoming messagers brought a scroll, your scribe would perhaps realize it out to you. romans were capable of reading and wri
should answer to the american people. everyone agrees we need to protect the environment, but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet epa's justification for regulation are cloaked in secrecy i asked. it appears the epa been a lot of stretches of science to justify its own object disappeared americans impacted by the agency's regulations have a right to see the data and determine for themselves independently these regulations are based on sound science for a partisan agenda. the epa's efforts to expand its regulatory reach across u.s. represented troubling trend. her example, take epa's current clean water act. it seeks to expand the definition of waters of the u.s. to give the agency unprecedented new authority over private property. according to media reports on this expansion of epa regulatory power could include almost all man-made and natural streams, lakes and ponds. this undermines states rights and increases federal control private property and could lead to the epa in our own backyard. the epa's efforts to demoni
us it to adapt to a changing environment and gives us the wonderful diversity we see in a room full of peel like this. although they can cause disease they also allow us to adapt. we should be thanksful for them. >> the natural context is how much do we differ. if the mutations are happen happening every time we reproduce how much is there between humans? identical twins differ at essentially zero d.n.a. bases. not quite true but close enough. they are identical at the d.n. allyl. unrelated humans? do i have any guesses as to how much an unrelated pair of humans differs at the d.n.a. level. one in what? well it is not very much. one in a thousand. so at the d.n. allyl, the most fundamental unit of our biology, we are 99.9% identical. there is an important message right there. if we compare ourselves to our nearest biological relative the chimp we are 99% identical to the chimp for d.n.a. sequencing we can line up and compare. we are more different from mice and thank goodness if you compare us to broccoli we are mostly different from broccoli at the d.n.a. level. but if you think ab
to and subject to environments, challenges and change, threats change. and our world, our country, this institution is not in the same place as it was 12 years ago, or even five years ago. if you begin with, we have unwound from one long war in iraq. we are unwinding from the longest war we've ever been in in afghanistan. different kinds of threats today, different dynamics. strategic interests vary, but the other part of that is that it doesn't mean that we are retreating from any part of the world. in fact, i'm leaving tonight for the middle east to spend a couple of days in bahrain attending the dialogue and then over to qatar and maybe some other countries. but i will say in that speech that i give there, and it does relate to what we're talking about here today, that our interests, the united states of america's interests, are the world's interest. our interests are not defined by one region or one country or one area. and that's part of what this announcement is today as we develop toward and into the next year on a lot of changes and adjustments and realignments that will b
and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we were able to get things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. joe then went on to the senate and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on capitol hill, something that evan knows a lot about. i went on to china to become our senior diplomat running the embassy there. and we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to become part of the o labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to kind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. come to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we have a two-party system. they are
. we know that this environment is ripe. there's also the expected growth of 30% per year for the next three years. one of the things that we did at sink or swim is that we were at the forefront of the technology area for online trading. we have been at the forefront of the content era, really. the amount of content that gets consumed through video every year is enormous. we need to make sure that the content is relevant and entertaining. but what is important is to make sure that the technology that is provided is pushing the content to the customer or has the ability to curate the content to make sure it is organized and easy to find. on top of that, make sure that video or that data is all on demand. they want it now. they expect it. the younger demographic expects that it is all easy access wherever they are. also, that it is free and shareable. thinking beyond mobile access to your bank account, taking it one step further, something that is simple. something that brokerage firms do today. you can get your debit card. you can write checks. you have access to more options. it is rea
environment and what gives us the wonderful physical diversity we see in a roomful of people like this. although mutations can cause disease they also allow us to adapt and we should be thankful for them. the natural question that comes up in this context is how much do we differ? at these mutations are happening every time we produce how much variation is there among humans? if we look at identical twins these are nature's clones. identical twins differ at essentially zero dna aces. it's not quite true but it's close enough. they are identical at the dna level. if we look at unrelated humans do i have any guesses as to how much an unrelated pair of humans differs at the dna level black swan and what? well it's not very much. one and 1000. at the dna level this most fundamental unit of our biology, we are 99.9% identical. there's an important message right there. if we compare ourselves to our nearest biological relative to champ we are 99% identical to the gym. this is for dna sequences that we can line up and compare. we compare ourselves to the mouse we differ at about a sixth to a
environments. in other words, the lone wolf terrorist do not inherit from other states. they are a part of our society and subjects of the political and economic ideology and religious environments. in other words, many of them share values through the technology through the website and so forth. some operate on one basis of a single attack and some operate on multiple attacks. there were a number of studies that were developed over the years that we are trying to follow on a daily basis and i think that it requires a great deal of interest in terms of radicalization and international society tries to understand what can be done to deal with it. so ultimately the discussion would provide i think the initial context for the discussion and the first speaker as i mentioned is spike bowman who has a very rich background in the government and in the academic community and taking one course now sco w. and one for the interns he is a student in the class so to be paired with a class tomorrow. i think of spike is a very broad experience in the government and counterintelligence, and also various posit
.s.-china cooperation on the environment is critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, carbon pollution, for our country and the world. we are particularly excited to have her here. this is the first time administrator mccarthy has spoken here at cap, and we are excited to have her here. president obama released the climate action plan. we at cap applaud the effort and recognize its critical goals. it is critical for the u.s. and the world that we embark on this effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to prepare the united states for the impacts of climate change, and to lead this international effort to combat climate change. we believe these efforts will ensure the u.s. grows economically, will create jobs, and will also meet the important challenge of reducing -- reduction in greenhouse gas admissions by 17% by 2020. we hope this event today highlights the importance of china as a key partner. combating global climate change is not something that the u.s. should tackle on its own. that is why we are excited about this u.s.-china engagement. we have been able to see firsthand that the epa is
pay the restaurant and food service and should attract people seeking a flexible work environment. whether they are students between careers or just looking for a second job to make ends meet there are significant movement in and out of the industry and in between employers that given the short-term nature of individual employment the administrative burden of educating and processing enrollments and declinatideclinati on's can prove almost as expensive as the coverage itself. restauranrestauran ts cannot absorb this cost and ultimately the cost will be borne by the public as a whole. the implementation threatens the safe haven of the flexible work environment for those who depend on it. thank you for the opportunity to testify before you today regarding the health care law and its effects of the business aggregation rules on small businesses like ours. i'm proud and grateful for the responsibility to serve my community in austin texas serving customers. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> tha
future fiscal challenges and evolving strategic environment. first, and under defense policy, based on an internal review led by the current undersecretary of defense, jim miller. this restructuring will better balance the workload across the policy with the secretary of defense has sustained our emphasis on the asia pacific region in space and cybercapabilities and better integrating emerging threats of homeland defense efforts and strengthening our security cooperation efforts while eliminating some senior executive positions, specifically it eliminates the deputy secretary undersecretary position in the chief of staff phases out this on business and stability operations and realigns the portfolios of the five assistant secretaries. the plan also eliminates for for physicians for their support structures and realignment of the policies staffed structure. and second, that the cmo position and this includes the management. .. the acting under secretary of defense for personnel and readiness rebalance resources across the office of three assistant secretaries of defense on forest man
are welcoming, safe environments. welcoming, safe, and collaborative environments. you cannot show me a school that works or a district or a state or a country that works where the notion of collaboration as opposed to competition, the notion of a welcoming, safe environment so that schools are central to the community, are not the dominant theory as opposed to testing and sanctioning. that is what we are trying to do. work with communities, solutions that are aligned with what communities need. we must rate neighborhood schools and try to make sure that public education is a hallmark of democracy and a propeller of our economy. most importantly, we must really make sure that we figure out how to enable all kids to have the opportunity to not only dream big, but achieve them. >> thank you. let me ask you one or two and then we will go to kimberly to start. let me ask you about the common core standards. you said you think that obamacare is bad and the implementation of the common core is far worse. who is to blame and anyone stepping up to fix this? >> i am not a big believer in blame. i am a
. they connect all forms of communication, whether they originate in a wire environment or a wireless. >> the future of the communications industry with walter mccormick. tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> they held their fall forum in washington last week. talked john huntsman about bipartisanship and partisanship. aware of them as a congress from both political problem -- parties to solve problems. republicans and democrats have been unable to find common ground on a number of issues. just to name a few -- the fiscal year 2014 budget. the farm bill. and immigration reform. reaching across the aisle has become more and more difficult and principled compromise seems like a mountain too tall to climb. this morning, i have the honor of introducing two national leaders who can hopefully help shed some light on how our legislative colleagues in washington, d.c. and the white house might be able to come together and find solutions to our nation's critical problems. let me begin with governor huntsman. he began his public service as a staff assistant to ronald reagan. he has since served four
that works focuses and makes sure that schools are welcoming, safe environment. welcoming, safe and collaborative environments. you can't show we a school that works or a district or a state or a cub that works -- country that works where that notion of collaboration as opposed to competition, that notion of welcoming and safe environment so that schools are central to communities are not the dominant theory as as opposed to testingd sanctioning. and so that's what we are trying to do, work with community, bottom-up solutions that are aligned with what communities need, great neighborhood public schools and, ultimately, really trying to make sure that every -- that public education is an anchor of our democracy, a to pell hour of our economy and probably most important, really, really make sure that we give and figure out how to enable all kids to have the opportunity to not only dream their dreams, but achieve them. >> and we are live this morning awaiting remarks from treasury secretary jacob lew on implementation of the dodd-frank financial regulations law. he will be introdu
in today's environment. >> i would concur with my colleagues and don't have anything to add. >> thank you very much. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i might make one comment in the refer to the plant in southern california and has 33% renewable mandate. i was talking to one of the ceos how one of the major utilities out there. as say build new transmission lines to bring in renewable power to where they need it, they're getting in some instances specific instructions to going underground on the transmission lines, which races are technical issues. the ceo in wrong to me that the mileage they are going underground is costing his utility $100 million a mile. so we are talking about some costly situations in some cases. this time to recognize the gentleman from texas, mr. olson for five minutes. >> i think the chair and i assure you i'll take only a maximum of four hours -- four minutes and 59 seconds of my time. >> witnesses. chairwoman lafleur, commissioner moeller, commissioner norris, welcome, happy holidays. i have one question about the tax credit. poster with you, commissioner moeller. fo
. and trying to make those demands in a changing, uncertain environment where you got to look and say, well, you can't work this much this weekend. the reality is, it's not just figures. i've heard from my district story after story of small business owners saying, you know, congressman, i didn't hire anybody this week. i'm not going to hire anybody next year because i'm worried about the threshold. i don't know what the rules are going to be. i'm not going to take that risk. and these are successful businessmen and women. but the message we're sending from washington is that, you know, we'll let you know next year. it doesn't work that way. any further comments from you all? i know i'm about out of time. but that's the frustration i'm hearing. >> i would just add -- thank you. i would just add it's an issue crying out for leadership. leadership in terms of what you're doing here today. that is seeking out the truth. what is the truth? what are the facts? then coming to at least some sort of agreement on what you can agree on. i mean, the american people, the small business owners, the larg
that tkupbts mean we'll get the disease. the environment, behavior, all things influence it. nd it's the inner play, especially for the most common diseases, hypertension, diabetes and so forth, we know that an inner play of genetic predisposition and outside factors. this is where it gets complicated but i really want to emphasize that genomics is a key part of the puzzle but not the only part. william is joining us on the phone with dr. aron green. ahead, please. caller: my question is, i was in vietnam and i caught malaria and i stayed in the fieldhouse for three months. when i came back to fort brag i had a relapse. i'm having problems, i can't and i have these out of whatever growing me and the va cut them out. or kind of after effect side effect or long term effect cause?his >> dr. green you can address the issue. preceded me just will be the expert on that. his is infectious disease and the doctor is a world expert on that. o i would refer to the institute he runs to get those insaogts. what will tell you to make the like malaria, for example, this is very disease, infectious district
about this idea. if the political environment is tough with fb a reason to delay the law or grant a waiver to the law if you cite to the political environment as your justification? congress isn't doing what i want. i may suffer political damage so i'm going to do it anyway. i think in your testimony you did make some good points. i will give you that. you didn't cite the justification for delaying the mandate. he was asked about a press conference and he said in the normal political environment i would call the speaker and say this doesn't go to the essence of the law and we would've delay for a year but the but there wasn't a political environment on quote unquote obamacare. i think that is totally outlandish of the explanation and even more because congress by the time he made that statement had already passed the bill to delay the employer mandate precisely for the reason the president suggested. let me ask another question because professor turley, i appreciate her testimony and you cite above examples of the founding fathers. mr. lazarus you made the point that it doesn't me
in a wireline or wireless environment. future of the communications industry, with u.s. telecom head walter mccormick. tonight on "the communicators," at 8:00 eastern on c-span2. >> i got upset with the president. the, at my mental health first few meetings. then they never showed up. housewalking in the white and i met this woman, one of the press people. , nobody ever covers my meetings. she said, mrs. carter, mental health is not a sexy issue. legislation and mental health systems act of 1980. it passed through congress one month before jimmy was, as he says, involuntary retired from the white house. the incoming president put it on a shelf. it was one of the greatest of women's of my life. >> rosalynn carter, tonight at 9:00 eastern, live on c-span and c-span3. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. upon returning from when he said was his eighth trip to the middle east, john kerry addressed a forum on u.s.-israel posted by the brookings institution's savon for him. he talks about the nuclear deal with the ran, palestinian peace talks, and syrian chemical weapons. he speaks for about 45
, volatile environment and a set of problems for which it is difficult to imagine solutions without someone catalyzing an international response. to me we cannot lose sight of the fact that we are a global power and global interest and that american power and security depends on staying engaged in the world and shaping events that happened far from our shores. we also have still i think a unique role to play in catalyzing international action to deal with challenges that we face. so the first lesson is that we need to resist the temptation to turn inward and a way for the world are you yes, we have to focus on getting our economic house in order and pushing our domestic agenda forward. but we also have to stay engaged in the world to ensure our own prosperity in the future. the second lesson is more tactical and that is as we have come out of the war in the past, typically the defense budget goes through the drawdown and we try to balance too much of the budget on the back of the force and we end up with a hollow force. we cut readiness and modernization disproportionately. we end up with a
, this environment is ripe. see, there's also the expected growth of 30% per year for the next three years. so one of the things that we did at sink or swim is we're really at the forefront of the technology era for online trading. and right now tastytrade, we have been at the forefront of the -- the amount of content that gets consumed through video every year is enormous. and so we need to make sure that the content is relevant, useful and entertaining. but what is also important to make sure that the technology that is provided is actually pushing the content, to -- the content to the customer. or has the ability to also curating the country to make sure it's organized and easy to find. on top of that, making sure that that video of that data is all on demand. they want it now. except. the younger demographdemograph ic expects that, expects that is all these access wherever they are. and also it is free and shareable. so thinking beyond just mobile access to your bank account, taking it one step further, something like simple. something like that which firms do today where you have access to yo
't easy to do in today's environment. >> i would conquer with my colleagues. >> thank you mr. chairman. >> i might comment on this you refer to the closing of the nuclear plant in southern california and california is a 33% renewable mandate and i was talking to one of the ceos of one of the major utilities out there and as they build new transmission lines to bring in renewable power to where they need it, they are getting in some instances specific instructions relating to some going underground on the transmission lines which raises a lot of technical issues and the ceo informed me that in the mileage that they are going underground is costing his utility $100 million a mile. so you know, we are talking about some costly situations in some cases. at this time i would recognize the gentleman from texas for five minutes. >> thank the chair for your patience. i will take only a maximum of four hours and four minutes on my time. chairwoman lafleur, commissioner moeller and clark, welcome, happy holidays. i have one question on the tax credit and start with you in the sugar. as you know
and principal intersection we have to make sure that we do not restrict the environment for the students to enter into. we have to be careful that we tread lightly. i have one question for you. you mention that the year-round telnet program, something that i have championed as a number of years ago. but that has gone by the wayside and those have been used to try to restrain the cost of the pell grant program. you mention this kind of in passing on page three. >> sure, first of all, the institutions are affected by ending what has been called the second tower and particularly black colleges in particular. the situation is that a number of students are coming in underprepared academically 45% and 45% at least one academic course. they are having to learn a postsecondary level, which is why we should have a college career ready for all students in because they were on track, they were not on track to graduate on time. what happened is that is that they were catching up. so that when they began their second year, they were actually going to be checking your students instead of a second-year
love the environment on you can actually achieve results. it was remarkable. joe then went on to the senate and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on capitol hill, something that evan knows a lot about. i went on to china to become our senior diplomat running the embassy there. and we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to become part of the no labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to kind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. come to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we have a two-party system. they are endeavoring to change the center of gravity away from acrimony from the problem solving. it's a lofty objective, can it be done? for those of you who have been around politics for a while, many of you have, of course you can change the operating culture of politics. that in a nutshell is what no la
for all and the introduction of proper sanitation sensitive to the protection of the environment. we are determined to address the dire housing shortage in a vigorous manner, acting together with the private sector and the communities in need of shelter. health also remains a fundamental building block of the humane society we are determined to create through the implementation of the reconstruction and development programme. we must address the needs of the aged and disabled, uplift disadvantaged sectors such as the women and the youth, and improve the lives of our people in the rural communities and the informal settlements. we must invest substantial amounts in education and training and meet our commitment to introduce free and compulsory education for a period of at least 9 years. everywhere we must reinculcate the culture of learning and of teaching and make it possible for this culture to thrive. [applause] we must combat such social pathologies as widespread poverty, the break down of family life, crime, alcohol and drug abuse, the abuse of children, women and the elderly and
between our armed forces. and from that demanding combat environment this kandahar, we transitioned two years ago to operation attention to train -- to the training mission devoted to supporting nato's main strategic objective, that of preparing the afghan national security forces to take responsibility for afghanistan's security by themselves. since 2011 canada has been the second largest contributor to the nato training mission after the united states. and and as kathleen said, roughly 950 of our troops focused on giving the afghans the tools they need not only to fight the taliban and affiliates, but also to train their own forces in this effect. indeed, afghan forces are now not only planning and leading most security operations across the nation, but 90% of all military training in afghanistan is now being conducted by the afghans themselves. that's a strategic and operational success, one that will pay dividends over the long term by helping insure that afghan forces can sustain their progress and ultimately help prevent afghanistan from ever again becoming a safe haven for terror
are somewhat different because we have to try to set standards in an environment of incomplete information. we don't have the benefit of decades of experience, and we know challenges are revolving. but it's still incumbent upon us to try to develop meaningful, cost effective regulation that we can enforce in an environment of imperfect knowledge. two weeks ago the commission approved version five of the critical infrastructure protection standards that cover the bulk electric grid against cybersecurity incidents. they're not perfect, we did is ask some questions as we approved them, things that we wanted modified, but they represent a substantial step forward from the protections that were in place before with. we've also started a rulemaking to require standards to protect against geomagnetic disturbances that can be caused by solar storms and human actions, a real example of high-impact, low-frequency threats to reliability that we need to get ready for before they happen. finally, i want to touch on the subject that congressman waxman raised, the physical security of the assets that make up
president? >> quickly, given our media environment for one. and you highlighted another obstacle he's facing and trying perceptions are set. and increasingly, the closer we 2016, the there are going to be more and more fixed. o that's a big challenge the white house faces. >> you want to talk to him about president obama, the legacy, how he's dealing with the most recent issues. healthcare.gov, the rollout of the website. the criticism he received. call.us a the phone lines there. 202-585-3881. democrats, 3880. 202-55-32882. on l take your comments e-mail and facebook and twitter. i want to ask you about the end of october. inattention to detail may hurt the presidential legacy. talk about the inattention to that you're seeing here? disclosures ping you'll recall. he said he was not aware that he united states was eavesdropping on the cell llor's personal phone. the glitches to the website is another that he has acknowledged has not prepared for. may are -- on their own seem relatively minor. of the the perception white house and a management team there that is trying to do things a it the
have dedicated my life to protecting the environment. i see no greater issue and no greater urgency to public health and climate change. climate change is not just a public health and safety issue. i consider it to be one of the greatest economic challenges of our time as well, which is why i am really looking forward to the trip, and why i was very excited in the summer when president obama spoke so eloquently and so comprehensively about the urgency to act on climate change, when he spoke at georgetown university. it was a speech that i had been hoping for, a president for many years, and i was so proud that it was our president. he showed enormous courage and enormous strength, as well as, he challenged us all to not just acknowledge the science of climate change, to understand that it is real and happening, but to also charge the cabinet to take immediate action. call me biased, but i believe it was his best speeches so far, although he is not done yet, i'm quite sure. he walked through his climate action plan as well, which outlined some common sense, pragmatic steps that the e
a single innocent bystander and if possible without telling anybody on the other side. in an environment where our european friends were pushing a peace plan that all of us thought had no chance in the world to succeed, but made us feel like they didn't want to do. we had a policy, we wanted to lift the arms embargo on the bosnians because the bosnian muslims could not get arms and the serbs have all the arms they needed courtesy of slobodan milosevic in serbia and we wanted the authority to use air strikes in early 1993 and warren christopher went to europe and the europeans told him to go home. they had no intention of doing this. so we went home and went back to work. you remember later, they talked about this in the panel, we finally got slowly, slowly, slowly more involved with more permission from our allies to do what i wanted us to do together. we got permission to do humanitarian air drops. that made a difference and leon went to work on sanctions that the un supported. than we had a safe area declared which worked until it didn't and 7,000 people were killed but they would not
the environment. so my question is what i am hearing or sensing and it isn't just for west virginia in this exploration of the marsalis and number of states it seems to be a potential jurisdictional problem starting to flare up a little bit and one of them is should we be treating the ngo thereby allowing the federal government to take care of that or should we continue having them handle this at the state level? do you have a position on that? >> i haven't thought of the jurisdictional question. it's a good thing for the committee to be looking at. there is a lot of stranded gas capacity as well as gas that is being flared because there isn't sufficient take away capacity for the liquids. the only do the pricing for the liquids pipeline under the interstate commerce act, but we don't do this writing. i suspect some of the sites would not welcome federal fighting. i think that we could do it well because we do it well with gas pipelines. but it might not be as popular with some of the states involved. but i think we have done a good job with it. >> whether or not are you going to ta
but it's not about us rebuilding of anniston. it's about as providing a security environment that allows that guinness and to build itself in an independent self secured afghanistan is absolutely in the national security interest of the united states of america. we forget that it's where the planning, financing and recruiting and training happened for 9/11. i will guarantee you they are licking their chops thinking making get back into those eastern provinces. we just can't let that happen and i don't know if you are familiar with the status of forces agreement that would give some function of the protection of our soldiers to operate there and how we would operate them and these are good international agreements. karzai is playing a game and i think he is figuring we want to the deal more than he wants the deal or he thinks we have to have a deal and i hope we don't play this game of chicken and turn away and walk away and i don't think that is where the mindset is. this deal is really important and by the way it sends a message both to our adversaries and their allies in the region tha
of these things give us a predisposition. that does not mean we are going to get the disease. the environment, behavior, social aspects of life, all of these things influence it. it is the interplay, especially for more common diseases, hypertension, diabetes. we know that there is an interplay. genetic predisposition but in terminal contributions. -- but environmental contributions, what you are eating, how much you exercise. i want to emphasize that genomics is a key part of this puzzle but it is not the only part. host: from maryland, william is joining us. dr. eric green at nih. -- i wasy question is in vietnam and i can't malaria. i stayed in the field house for three months. when i came back to fort brag, i had a relapse. i am having problems. i cannot hear that well. warts growing out of me. the va cut the amount. -- cut them out. what kind of side effect or long-term effect is this? host: can you adjust that? thet: dr. fauci would be expert on that. this is an infectious disease. i would refer you to the institute that he runs to get the sort of insight. what i will tell you to make t
of these things give us a predisposition, but that doesn't mean that we will get this. the environment, the behavior, the social aspects of life, all of these things are influenced and it is the interplay, especially for these were common diseases like hypertension and diabetes and so forth. we know that there is an interplay and a genetic predisposition of what you are eating and how much exercise you are getting and so on and so forth. so this is where it gets very complicated, but i want to make sure that i emphasize that the genomic is a key part of this puzzle. >> host: we have doctor eric green, please go ahead with your question or comment. >> caller: hello, i was in vietnam and i caught malaria and when i came back to fort bragg, i had a relapse. i am having problems and i cannot hear that well. and i have these warts or what whatever growing out of me and the va cut it out. what kind of long-term effect will this have? >> the person that spoke with me on these interviews would really be the expert on that. this is an expert on infectious disease and we have a world expert on t
an environment in which israel is confident about its security and a lot of the old barriers to commerce and educational exchange and all that has begun to break down, that's something that the young people of gaza are going to want. and the pressure that will be placed for the residents of gaza to experience that same future is something that is going to be i think overwhelmingly appealing. but that is probably going to take place during the course of some sort of transition period. and the security requirements that israel requires will have to be met. and i think that is able -- that we can accomplish that, but ultimately it's going to be something that requires everybody to stretch out of their comfort zones. and the one thing i will say to the people of israel is that you can be assured whoever is in the office i currently occupy, democrat or republican, that your security will be uppermost on our minds. that will not change. and that should not mean you let up on your vigilance in terms of wanting to look out for your own country. it does -- it should give you some comfort, though,
whether they originate in the wire line environment or in a wireless environment. so, yeah, i would say america's future is a wire line future. >> the future of the communications industry with u.s. telecom head walter mccormick tonight on "the communicators" at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span2. >> next, house and senate negotiations on a budget compromise. the plan, due by this friday. this is from today's washington journal. >> host: welcome back. we're joined now by bob bixby, executive director of the concord coalition. thank you for joining us this morning. >> guest: you're welcome. >> host: over the weekend it was reported that negotiators are getting closer to a budget deal. tell us what that's likely to look like and what it means. >> guest: well, it looks like what they're going to try to do is replace about two years' worth of the sequestration cuts which was a lower level of cap that went into effect earlier this year and replace the savings so it wouldn't add to the deficit by increasing some government fees and perhaps requiring a higher contribution from federal workers for their
say that our primary focus really should be on continuing to put in place an environment that creates jobs, that lays a foundation for economic growth, and that's one of the things that getting a budget deal would help do. we've recently seen some signs of progress in the economy, the jobs report on friday was positive with over 200,000 private-sector jobs added in november, and we've now had 45 straight months of private-sector job growth. but we all know that we're not out of the woods yet. we have a lot more work to do. and we need to build on the momentum that is there to get more people back to work. when i travel around new hampshire, my constituents tell me that they're very frustrated with the gridlock in washington and what they want is for us to agree on a budget and to take action that supports economic growth. granite staters are absolutely right about that. with the potential budget agreement, we have an opportunity to eliminate some of the uncertainty in our economy, to eliminate some of those harmful cuts that are part of sequestration, the automatic budget cuts and to
that there woken be much change. and again that kind of non-dynamic environment is an opportunity, not a obstacle. a big institution lots of people care about sometimes during the course of the year lots ever people will tune in. is there constitutional right to same-sex marriage? yeah there's a big part of population interested of that. is obamacare constitutional? a huge number of people will focus on it in an institution will not adapt itself because it is very stayed in -- staid in getting that information out there. what it is they're that we're doing as part after national conversation it should be clear to everyone we're hardly alone. so for example, american lawyer media for which tony now works, has this wonderful publication, supreme court insider, which is getting more information about the court. pete now reports not on, all the law that, the justice department, the supreme court but they have instead of one platform in nbc news now, msnbc ends the website of "nbc news." so i do think that we're far from alone in taking advantage of the lower cost of distribution. we should talk at so
in welcoming, safe, collaborative environments, and we have to have the wraparound services because we are the first responders to poverty. breakfast, that is lunch, and dinner, like i saw at the school in cincinnati, or whether it is what we're doing at mcdowell in terms of really wrapping services around all of these schools in the eighth course -- eighth worst county in america, when you do those things, schools succeed. and more important, the nation succeeds. thank you. >> thank you very much. appreciate it. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> in a few moments, representative greg walden, chairman on the communications on his plan to update the communications act. in 15 minutes, a hearing on how the health care law will affect medicare advantage plans. after that, president obama on jobs, the economy, and income inequality. several live events tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be discussing the state of financial reform on c-span two at 8:45 eastern. a.m., marissa of the house energy a
environment, the compliance rate will go up and then i'll see the number drop over time. so the answer to your question is, is i fix it by putting procedures in place that drive the ro in the right direction and put system i think i think if -- fixes in place that force the behavior to ensure the veteran gets the right decision. >> before i yield, e i remind you and remind everybody how many times secretary sat there and talked about accountability. you do all the system call stuff you want. if you are not motivating people to do it, i know they are highly motivated people who want to do right by the veteran. there's a lack of accountability there. and across the board, but with that i'll yield to mr. oh -- >> thank i apologize for missing the second half of the hearing. i'll get ab update how you responded to the specific issues raised by ms. price and the veteran service organizations that were here. so just briefly bring up two issues. one, is in el paso at fort bliss we have 1800 cases, 1100 are backlogged at the derail site in seattle. and so just a plea from cornel and william beau month
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